RevitalizeWA Preservation and Main Street Conference, Port Townsend, Washington.

 Justin Dennis poses with his Entrepreneur of the Year award. Congratulations Justin!

Justin Dennis poses with his Entrepreneur of the Year award. Congratulations Justin!

 Visiting the Ferry House at Ebey’s Landing, Whidbey Island.

Visiting the Ferry House at Ebey’s Landing, Whidbey Island.

 L to R: Erasmo Gamboa, Claudia Kiyama, Clarence Moriwaki listen to a question during the Telling Difficult Stories session.

L to R: Erasmo Gamboa, Claudia Kiyama, Clarence Moriwaki listen to a question during the Telling Difficult Stories session.

 Farming Ebey's Prarie, Whidbey Island.

Farming Ebey's Prarie, Whidbey Island.

 Heather Dudley-Nollette poses for a photo in the Hastings Building. Ms. Dudley-Nollett is the project manager for the historic building rehabilitation project, and is also the great, great, great, granddaughter of the original builders, Lucinda and Loren Brown Hastings.

Heather Dudley-Nollette poses for a photo in the Hastings Building. Ms. Dudley-Nollett is the project manager for the historic building rehabilitation project, and is also the great, great, great, granddaughter of the original builders, Lucinda and Loren Brown Hastings.

 A participant in the RevitalizeWA Historic Preservation conference tours a second floor office space of the Hastings Building. Designed by Elmer H. Fisher, the building was constructed between 1889-90.

A participant in the RevitalizeWA Historic Preservation conference tours a second floor office space of the Hastings Building. Designed by Elmer H. Fisher, the building was constructed between 1889-90.

 A view of the bay windows and blue-painted brick along the southwest elevation of the Hastings Building.

A view of the bay windows and blue-painted brick along the southwest elevation of the Hastings Building.

 Young Preservationists gather at Sirens Pub in Port Townsend.

Young Preservationists gather at Sirens Pub in Port Townsend.

Au revoir Sears

 The east and north elevations of the Sears department store in Shoreline WA., April 2, 2018. Photographed on 5x7 inch panchromatic film.

The east and north elevations of the Sears department store in Shoreline WA., April 2, 2018. Photographed on 5x7 inch panchromatic film.

 The eastern storefront photographed nine days later on April 11, showing the entry doors covered with brown paper, and the iconic "Sears" sign removed. Shot with an iPhone through my car's windshield.

The eastern storefront photographed nine days later on April 11, showing the entry doors covered with brown paper, and the iconic "Sears" sign removed. Shot with an iPhone through my car's windshield.

 A lone worker stands amid the empty showroom. The Shoreline Sears opened in 1967. 

A lone worker stands amid the empty showroom. The Shoreline Sears opened in 1967. 

Ironically, Sears would meet its demise because of a reincarnation of what made the innovative retailer successful in the first place, the mail-order catalog. The modern day internet and on-line retail shopping model is in essence an electronic equivalent of how mostly rural America shopped using the Sears catalog during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Revisiting Ortho

Salmon Bay Bridge (Bridge No. 4), Seattle, WA

This comparative example shows panchromatic film with a yellow (K2) filter (left), compared to orthochromatic (blue-sensitive) film with no filter (right). The inherent characteristic of ortho film to render the sky considerably lighter than panchro film, helps to emphasize the design of the bridge truss and superstructure. I have experimented with using a blue filter paired with panchromatic film to simulate the look of ortho, but found the trade-off in effective film speed to be objectionable. I rate Ilford’s Ortho Plus and FP4 at iso 80.  I process the Ortho Plus with Fomadon diluted 1:50. Since orthochromatic film is available in 4x5 and 8x10 but not in the 5x7 format, I purchase it in 8x10 and trim it down to 5x7. The guide notches are then added manually. The film can be handled under a Kodak #2 deep red safelight, making this process relatively easy. Shot with a 180mm Schneider lens, 1/2 and 1/4 second at ƒ32 respectively.

New Book Has Been Published

 People of Snohomish, Angels and Friends.

People of Snohomish, Angels and Friends.

I'm pleased to announce that Snohomish Historian Warner Blake and I will be signing our new book "J.S. White: Our First Architect" on July 30 in Snohomish. Please stop by and help us celebrate. Thank you so much to Warner for his brilliant research and dedication, to all the Angels who so generously supported this project, and especially to Karen Guzak, whose generosity, leadership, and inspiration started this whole thing rolling.

WHAT: Booking Signing of the fine art book J.S. White Our First Architect
by writer Warner Blake and photographer Otto Greule

WHERE: Uppercase Bookshop, 2nd Street and Avenue B, Snohomish

WHEN: Sunday, July 30, 2-4p 

WHY: Grand Opportunity to purchase the book and support both the independent bookstore and our publication Published by the People of Snohomish and Friends.

J.S. White: Our First Architect documents White’s surviving structures from 19th-century Snohomish with essays by local historian Warner Blake and color photographs by Otto Greule. White left nothing behind except his buildings, so Blake combed through newspapers of the time to discover White’s story and identify his structures. Particularly notable is the White Building — the builder-architect’s own two-story red brick masterpiece, which was misidentified for more than 50 years. Generously illustrated with over 60 historic photographs, this book is also the story of the city’s rise and fall as the birthplace of Snohomish County.
(From the dust jacket back.)

BONUS EVENT ON THE RADIO: Warner and Karen will be guests on KSER’s Sound Living, Friday, July 28th at 4p.  
Hosted by veteran independent broadcaster Ed Bremer, and it’s a call-in show: 425.303.9070!  
Photographer Otto Greule will be standing by in Seattle to join in … why not you too?